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Decoding the Quotes

by Diannek

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As I finish up this latest issue of Clever, I've been rummaging through old papers. It's a constant chore to keep the clutter and mess at bay. I know we all struggle with it, but I seem to have contracted a serious case of the anti-clutter bug. So things are a little hectic around here as I go through old books, art supplies, and paper files. Spring cleaning seems to have reared its ugly head big time. But now that summer is just around the corner, I see a glimmer of hope.

Found this quote from Stephen King on what he wants to do to his readers: "I want to mess with your life. I want you to miss appointments, burn dinner, skip your homework. I want you to tell your wife to take that moonlight stroll on the beach at Waikiki with the resort tennis pro while you read a few more chapters."

I'm not a huge fan of King because he scares me too much, but that's exactly the kind of book I want to read this summer.

And then I found this one, by an anonymous writer: Don't let perfect be the death of good.

So putting these two ideas together, I've come up with a plan. Don't worry so much about neatening everything. Instead pick up a book and ignore fine-tuning the rest of the clutter for a while.

Speaking of quotes, here's another one I found: Just because you don't know where you are going, doesn't mean you are lost. That quote keeps me from panicking many times. I'm not a big fan of GPS navigation. I'm still a dead-reckoning kind of gal, I take visual flight rules very seriously, and enjoy the little adventure when trying to find a place I've never been to before. I do consult paper and virtual maps regularly and then just try to remember how many lefts and rights to make until I get there. Sometimes that doesn't work. But luckily I have a smart phone, so I'm never in real trouble. I think that comes from living on islands. As long as I can see the slope of the land or know where the water is, I'm good. Same with living in a valley. Valleys give you the lay of the land. Valleys make things easy. You always have a landmark.

I do remember being in Los Angeles one time when my map failed me and of course, the hills are very far away, LA seems like one huge grid of flatness. I was looking for a landmark that I just couldn't find. It had been moved but my map didn't know it. I ended up in Watts. It was a nice sunny morning and it didn't seem very scary. I needed to ask for directions. I left my daughter in the car because I could see the men inside the donut shop were smoking. Sheri is allergic to smoke. So I went in to ask directions and pick up some donuts. Gotta love those random donut shops. The men laughed at me when I asked them where the landmark was and then they told me how to get there. When I bought the donuts the man said, "you know, you don't have to be afraid of us, we won't hurt you or your daughter." I just smiled, thanked them and left. It wasn't even a close call.

Then there's my all-time least favorite quote that I keep hearing from people who are trying to sound smart: Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. First off, I don't have any enemies that I can think of offhand. There is a short list of people that really annoy me, then another list of people that somewhat annoy me, and a few people I have written off completely. Mostly I just try to stay away from this whole group, if at all possible. "Closer" is not an option. There's that "companion" quote: The enemy of my enemy is my friend. What a tangled web that is. Since I'm really not the warrior type, I don't think this applies to me. I want to stay away from my enemies, whoever they might be, and if they have enemies, I'd just as soon stay away from them too. Yikes.

I go in peace, sometimes a little haphazardly, but peacefully.


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